Toll Free (US):+1(800)9439753
Sale!

Azilect

Azilect (rasagiline) is a monotherapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that has been available in the United States since 2006.

$44.95$224.95

Added to wishlistRemoved from wishlist 0
Add to compare
The orders are shipped to almost all countries of the worlds Including USA, Canada, United Kingdom and EU countries.
Express: 5-9 business days
Standard: 10-21 days
SKU: 87503 Category:

Azilect – Rasagiline – 0.5mg/1mg

  • Brand: Rasalect
  • Manufacturer:
  • Disease: Parkinson’s Disease / Stiffness / Tremors / Spasms / Poor Muscle Control

Rasagiline is a selective, irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B), which catalyzes the degradation of dopamine and other neurotransmitters. Inhibition of MAO-B by rasagiline results in an increase in dopamine levels and may improve parkinsonian symptoms. The recommended dose of rasagiline is 1 mg/day, taken as a single tablet with or without food at any time during the day.

The efficacy and safety profile of rasagiline was established in two large randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials involving over 1,500 patients with PD who were treated for up to 2 years. In both trials, treatment with rasagiline resulted in significant reductions from baseline scores on the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), compared to placebo recipients; these benefits were seen as early as 4 weeks after starting therapy and were maintained throughout 24 months of treatment. Additionally, there was no evidence that long-term use of rasagiline caused adverse effects on cognitive function or activities of daily living when compared to placebo recipients.

Based on these findings, rasagline can be considered an important therapeutic option for patients with PD who are seeking relief from their symptoms.


Frequently asked Questions

Should Azilect be taken with food?

It was first approved by the FDA in 2006 for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Rasagiline has been found to be effective in slowing down the progression of symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease, including tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia. In addition to its use for treating Parkinson’s disease, rasagiline has also been shown to be beneficial for reducing inflammation and preserving cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.


What happens if I stop taking Azilect?

It was the first drug approved for the treatment of early Parkinson’s disease in 2001. Rasagiline blocks an enzyme called monoamine oxidase B, which breaks down dopamine in the brain. This allows dopamine levels to increase, which may improve symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

Rasagiline is available as a tablet that is taken once daily with or without food. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, and headache. Rasagiline may also increase the risk of bleeding and should not be used by people who are taking other medications that can increase this risk such as warfarin (Coumadin).

People with Parkinson’s disease often experience a gradual loss of muscle control that leads to problems walking, talking, and completing everyday tasks. Rasagiline can help improve movement in some people with early-stage Parkinson’s disease and may delay the need for more aggressive treatments such as levodopa therapy.


Can Azilect cause high blood pressure?

It was first approved by the FDA in 2006 for the treatment of early Parkinson’s disease, and later approved for use as an adjunct therapy to levodopa/carbidopa in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease.

The mechanism of action of rasagiline is not fully understood, but it is thought to work by inhibiting monoamine oxidase B, which breaks down dopamine and other neurotransmitters. This results in increased levels of dopamine and may improve symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease.

Rasagiline has been found to be well tolerated, with a low incidence of adverse effects. The most common side effects are nausea, dizziness, headache, and fatigue. Rasagiline should not be used by people who are taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), as this may increase the risk of serious side effects such as serotonin syndrome.


How long does Azilect stay in your system?

Rasagiline was first introduced as an adjunctive therapy to levodopa in 2001 and has been studied as a monotherapy. In patients with early Parkinson’s disease, rasagiline may improve symptoms and slow progression of the disease. Rasagiline is available as tablets in dosages of 1 mg and 2 mg. The most common side effects associated with rasagiline are headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Rasagiline should not be used in combination with other MAO inhibitors or within 14 days after discontinuing use of such agents because severe adverse reactions can occur.


Does Azilect really work?

It is a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, which means it helps to keep dopamine levels in the brain stable. This can help improve symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and slowed movement. Azilect is taken orally once a day, with or without food. Side effects may include nausea, dizziness, and headache.


Does Azilect Slow Progression Parkinson's?


Does Azilect stop tremors?

It is a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, which means it helps to keep dopamine levels in the brain stable. This can help improve symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and slowed movement. Azilect is taken orally once a day, with or without food. Side effects may include nausea, dizziness, and headache.

It is a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, which means it helps to keep dopamine levels in the brain stable. This can help improve symptoms such as tremors, stiffness, and slowed movement. Azilect is taken orally once a day, with or without food. Side effects may include nausea, dizziness, and headache.

Rasagiline was the first drug approved for the treatment of early Parkinson’s disease in 2001. Rasagiline is a selective MAO-B inhibitor, meaning it inhibits the enzyme monoamine oxidase B which breaks down dopamine and other neurotransmitters in the brain. By inhibiting MAO-B, rasagiline helps to preserve dopamine levels and may slow or stop the progression of Parkinson’s disease.

Rasagiline is available as a pill that can be taken once daily with or without food. In clinical trials, rasagiline was found to be safe and effective for treating early Parkinson’s disease, even when used in combination with other medications such as levodopa/carbidopa (L-dopa/CD). Common side effects associated with rasagiline include nausea, dizziness, headache, and insomnia. More serious side effects are rare but can include high blood pressure and hallucinations.

If you are diagnosed with early Parkinson’s disease, your doctor may prescribe rasagaline as one part of your treatment plan along with lifestyle changes and other medications such as L-dopa/CD. Talk to your doctor about whether rasaginle might be right for you


Can Azilect cause dyskinesia?

Rasagiline was first introduced as an adjunct therapy for the management of early stage Parkinson’s disease and was found to be more effective than placebo in delaying the need for levodopa therapy. Rasagiline also appears to improve motor function and reduce disability in patients with advanced Parkinson’s disease. The most common side effects associated with rasagiline are nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.


What are the side effects of Azilect?

Rasagiline selectively inhibits MAO-B, an enzyme that metabolizes dopamine in the brain. By inhibiting MAO-B, rasagiline preserves dopamine levels, which may improve symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Rasagiline is available as a tablet and can be taken once daily with or without food.

The most common side effects associated with rasagiline are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, headache, and insomnia. In rare cases, more serious side effects such as hallucinations and psychosis may occur. Patients should consult their healthcare provider if they experience any unusual side effects while taking rasagiline.

Rasagiline has been shown to be effective in improving motor function and reducing levodopa-related dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson’s disease. In a clinical trial comparing rasagline to placebo over two years showed that those on the medication had less decline on Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores than those who were not treated. A study published in 2017 also found that long term use of rasgline was associated with slower progression of disability. These studies suggest that rasgline may help delay or prevent worsening symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease

Specification: Azilect

Quantity

, , , , , ,

Dosage

,

User Reviews

0.0 out of 5
0
0
0
0
0
Write a review

There are no reviews yet.

Be the first to review “Azilect”

Your email address will not be published.

24healthgoods.com
Logo
Compare items
  • Total (0)
Compare
0
Shopping cart