Toll Free (US):+1(800)9439753

Antidepressants: 7 Different Types and How They Work

7 different types of antidepressants

There are a lot of different types of antidepressants, but they all work in the same general way. Each type affects chemical messengers called neurotransmitters. These chemical messengers send signals from one brain cell to another. Antidepressants can help balance these chemicals so that you feel better and think more clearly. Whether you have been diagnosed with depression or are just feeling blue for a few days, there are many natural remedies that can lift your spirits, such as exercise, getting enough rest and sunlight, eating healthy foods and getting involved in activities you enjoy.

But as many people find out sooner or later, these measures aren’t always enough to ease the pain of clinical depression. In some cases, your doctor might recommend an antidepressant medication to help support your natural healing process and get you back on track again. Read on to learn more about the various types of antidepressants and their potential side effects so that you can make an informed decision if they might be right for you.

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most common type of antidepressant. They work by keeping serotonin in the space between brain cells longer, which makes you feel better by boosting your mood and easing anxiety. Examples include: fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), citalopram (Celexa), escitalopram (Lexapro), fluvoxamine (Luvox), and sibutramine (Meridia). Sibutramine, a serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is used to treat obesity.

SNRIs (serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors)

Serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) work by blocking the reuptake of serotonin and norepinephrine. This helps keep your mood balanced and improves your feelings of well-being. Examples include: venlafaxine (Effexor), desvenlafaxine (Prestiq), duloxetine (Cymbalta), and levomilnacipran (Fetzima). Venlafaxine and desvenlafaxine can be dangerous to a fetus so they are not recommended for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.

TCAs (tricyclic antidepressants)

Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) increase serotonin and norepinephrine levels. Examples include: amitriptyline (Elavil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), imipramine (Tofranil), amoxapine (Asendin), clomipramine (Anafranil), desipramine (Norpramin), doxepin (Sinequan), protriptyline (Vivactil), and trimipramine (Surmontil). TCAs are more likely to cause dizziness, blurred vision, dry mouth, constipation and urinary retention than other types of antidepressants. They also have a higher risk of causing a fatal heart arrhythmia than other types of antidepressants.

NMDA receptor antagonists

NMDA receptor antagonists block the neurotransmitter glutamate. They are used to treat OCD and PTSD. Examples include: the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) fluoxetine (Prozac), or venlafaxine (Effexor), or the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) duloxetine (Cymbalta).

Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocker

Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blocker inhibits the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is related to learning and memory. They are used to treat Alzheimer’s disease. Examples include: the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil (Aricept), which is also used to treat mild cognitive impairment.

5-HT1A receptor agonist

5-HT1A receptor agonists activate serotonin receptors. They are used to treat anxiety disorders and insomnia. Examples include: the serotonin-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (SDRIs) duloxetine (Cymbalta), the serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) venlafaxine (Effexor), the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRIs) fluoxetine (Prozac), and the serotonin-norepinephrine-dopamine reuptake inhibitor (SNDDRIs) brofaromine (Wellbutrin).

GABAnergic agent

GABAnergic agents increase the amount of GABA in the brain. They are used to treat anxiety disorders and insomnia. Examples include: the GABA reuptake inhibitor zolpidem (Ambien), the GABA agonist zaleplon (Sonata), and the GABA reuptake inhibitor tiagabine (Gabitril).

Conclusion

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most common type of antidepressant. They work by keeping serotonin in the space between brain cells longer, which makes you feel better by boosting your mood and easing anxiety. GABAA receptor agonists boost the amount of GABA in the brain; NMDA receptor antagonists block the neurotransmitter glutamate; Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor blockers inhibit the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is related to learning and memory; 5-HT1A receptor agonists activate serotonin receptors; GABAnergic agents increase the amount of GABA in the brain; and, the neurotransmitter serotonin is involved in many bodily functions, including mood, sleep, appetite, and sexual desire.

      24healthgoods.com
      Logo
      Compare items
      • Total (0)
      Compare
      0
      Shopping cart